NetCDF operators (NCO) version 4.6.3

Version 4.6.3 of the netCDF Operators (NCO) has been released. NCO is an Open Source package that consists of a dozen standalone, command-line programs that take netCDF files as input, then operate (e.g., derive new data, average, print, hyperslab, manipulate metadata) and output the results to screen or files in text, binary, or netCDF formats.

The NCO project is coordinated by Professor Charlie Zender of the Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine. More information about the project, along with binary and source downloads, are available on the SourceForge project page.

From the release message:

4.6.3 adds many new convenience features to existing functionality like JSON, ncap2, ncremap, and ncclimo. Multi-dimensional bracketing completes our JSON implementation. ncap2 adds a convenient UDUnits conversion function. ncremap and ncclimo support long options. ncclimo supports binary climatology generation and annual-mean mode.

New Features
  1. ncclimo supports "binary climos" and annual-mean mode. Binary climos are climos created from merging two climos, rather than re-computing a climos from raw input. This saves disk space and time for long climos. Annual-mean mode allows ncclimo to process input files that are annual rather than monthly means.
    http://nco.sf.net/nco.html#ncclimo
  2. ncrcat and ncra now re-base data (move to a common time origin) from arbitrary time units in multiple calendar systems. Previously, re-basing only worked when the basetime (i.e., the YYMMDD in units like "XXX since YYMMDD") changed. Now rebasing takes into account the full units, both the increment (XXX) and the basetime (YYMMDD). Thanks to Dave Allured for the suggestion and Henry Butowsky for the re-implementation.
    http://nco.sf.net/nco.html#rbs
  3. ncap2 now supports converting data between any two compatible units systems supported by UDUnits. The udunits() function takes and input variable and a UDUnits dimension string.
    T[lon]={0.0,100.0,150.0,200.0;
    T@units="Celsius";
    T=udunits(T,"kelvin");
    print(T);
    273.15, 373.15, 423.15, 473.15 ;
    The method auto-magically reads var_in@units and var_in@calendar (so, YES, this works with dates) attributes as necessary. Thanks to Henry Butowsky for this feature.
    http://nco.sf.net/nco.html#udunits_fnc}
  4. ncclimo and ncremap now support long options, e.g.,
    ncclimo --case=caseid --input=drc_in --output=drc_out --map=rgr_map
    ncremap --input_file=in_fl --destination=dst_fl --output_file=out_fl
    
    http://nco.sf.net/nco.html#ncclimo
    http://nco.sf.net/nco.html#ncremap
  5. ncclimo and ncremap now save the full command line with which they were invoked as a single global attribute. Previously portions were saved as separate attributes. The new attributes are climo_command and remap_command. Their contents will exactly replicate (except for datestamps) the climatologies or regridded files they were created for. This improved provenance comes at the cost of up to a few kB more metadata in each file.
  6. ncks can now print attribute CDL types as comments. CDL attribute types can be hard for humans to discern, so now ncks will print the type when invoked with -D 1 or greater. The printed file is fully CDL-compliant and works with ncgen. Credit to whomever first thought of this feature, and implemented it in some CDL output someone sent me.
    zender@firn:~/nco$ ncks -D 1 -C --cdl ~/nco/data/in_4.nc
    ...
    att_var:byte_att = 0b, 1b, 2b, 127b, -128b, -127b, -2b, -1b ; // byte
    att_var:char_att = "Sentence one.\n",
       "Sentence two.\n" ; // char
    att_var:short_att = 37s ; // short
    att_var:int_att = 73 ; // int
    att_var:float_att = 73.f, 72.f, 71.f, 70.01f, 69.001f, 68.01f, 67.01f ; // float
    att_var:double_att = 73., 72., 71., 70.01, 69.001, 68.01, 67.010001 ; // double
    att_var:ubyte_att = 0ub, 1ub, 2ub, 127ub, 128ub, 254ub, 255ub, 0ub ; // ubyte
    att_var:ushort_att = 37us ; // ushort
    att_var:uint_att = 73ul ; // uint
    
  7. JSON brackets. Similar the CDL and XML backends, ncks supports JSON (as of 4.6.2). ncks now prints strided brackets to demarcate inner dimensions of multi-dimensional variable data. Invoking with --json vs. --jsn_fmt=4 on foo(2,3,4) yields:
    "data": [[[0.0, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0], [4.0, 5.0, 6.0, 7.0], [8.0, 9.0,
    10.0, 11.0]], [[12.0, 13.0, 14.0, 15.0], [16.0, 17.0, 18.0, 19.0],
    [20.0, 21.0, 22.0, 23.0]]]
    "data": [0.0, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, 7.0, 8.0, 9.0, 10.0,
    11.0, 12.0, 13.0, 14.0, 15.0, 16.0, 17.0, 18.0, 19.0, 20.0, 21.0,
    22.0, 23.0]
    
    Bracketed data are suitable for pasting into Python. More sample output at:
    http://dust.ess.uci.edu/tmp/in.json and other *.json files. Thanks to Henry Butowsky for implementing the bracketing.
    http://nco.sf.net/nco.html#json

Additional details are available in the ChangeLog.

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