Showing entries tagged [metpymonday]

MetPy Mondays #13 - Temperature Units

One of the most common support questions we get regarding MetPy is why temperature calculations fail. As it turns out, temperature units are a bit strange as they have an offset relative to an absolute value and a scaling factor. Learn how to properly handle temperature in your calculations with this week's MetPy Monday!

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MetPy Monday #10 - Harvey and Irma

Seisminc noise from hurricane Irma
Hurricane Irma

Wow! We’ve had a very active couple of weeks in the Atlantic and I wanted to break the planned series of MetPy Monday posts with a bit of timely data analysis and some interesting animations. The new (and still experimental/non-operational) GOES-16 satellite has provided us with some incredible views of hurricanes Harvey and Irma, and likely will with Jose as well.

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MetPy Monday #9 - 2017 Total Solar Eclipse

Last Monday was a big day for folks in the geoscience and astrosciences — the 2017 total solar eclipse! Many of those on the Unidata team made the drive to be in the path of totality, where the sun was completely blocked for a period of up to two and a half minutes. In this MetPy Monday post, we will take a look at some animations made in Python and posted by the team just after the eclipse.

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MetPy Mondays #8 - Interactive Dewpoint Calculator

I recently installed a weather station in my back yard. Every day I look at the display and see the temperature, wind, rain, and humidity, but the dewpoint is not displayed by default! As it turns out, dewpoint is a tricky thing to directly measure. The only way to directly measure it is with a fogged mirror sensor. Otherwise a hygrometer or psychrometer can be used to measure humidity or wet-bulb temperature, and then the dewpoint can be calculated. MetPy has the calculation functions to do both of these conversions. In this week’s MetPy Monday I’ll show you how to use the Jupyter Notebook’s interactive widgets to make a dewpoint calculator with slider widgets. This is a great way to get students to interact with formulas and get an intuitive sense of how they work!

MetPy Mondays #7- Contouring a Field on a Map

Last week we looked at how to create a simple base map with Cartopy. In this week’s MetPy Monday, we learn about contouring a field on the map and some of the idiosyncrasies of cyclic points. In the end, we will have a plot of the globe with the Coriolis parameter contoured. You can use this functionality to create height maps and more!

We’ll start off with importing the tools we will use: matplotlib, MetPy calculations, MetPy units, and numpy. We’re also using the magic %matplotlib inline so figures show up in the notebook instead of in separate windows.

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