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[LDM #CIB-153307]: ldm.pq



Hi Wen,

re:
> I tried to install LDM on our new system fujita.valpo.edu. I did the 
> followings:
> 
> download and unpack the latest version LDM-6.8.1
> cd ~ldm/ldm-6.1.0/src
> ./configure
> make
> make install
> sudo make install_setuids

OK.  Looks good so far...

re:
> It looked smooth, but there is no ldm.pq file installed. I see a system 
> variable
> in the scripts configure and configure.in $data_path. Should I define it 
> somewhere
> before installation or do something else?

The other parts of the installation that you may done but not mentioned or may 
not
have done are:

<as 'ldm'>
cd ~ldm
ln -s ldm-6.8.1 runtime
ln -s runtime/* .

mkdir decoders util

-- locate a file system where you have enough space to create a sufficiently 
sized
   LDM queue and store data.  This may be under the LDM installation, or it may
   be on a different file system that has more room (the recommendation).

   For the sake of argument, let's assume that you installed the LDM under
   /home/ldm.  Let's further assume that you have a different file system
   that has a lot of space that you want to use to store data.  Create
   /data on that file system, and make /data readable/writeable/executable
   by the user 'ldm'.  Then continue with the following while still in
   the /home/ldm directory:

ln -s /data ~ldm/data
mkdir ~/ldm/data/logs
ln -s ~ldm/data/logs logs

-- edit your shell-specific configuration file (e.g., .cshrc for Cshell, .bashrc
   for Bash, etc.) and add the ~ldm/bin, ~ldm/decoders, and ~ldm/util 
directories
   to your PATH.  After doing this, make sure that the additions to PATH
   have been made active (e.g., for Cshell users you would type 'source 
~ldm/.cshrc;
   for Bash you should be ready to go).

At this point you need to decide how large of an LDM product queue you 
need/want.
The default is for 400 MB (or 500 MB, I can't remember off of the top of my
head), and this may be enough for the data you want to ingest.  If it is, you
can now create the LDM product queue:

ldmadmin mkqueue

This should create the flie ldm.pq in the ~ldm/data directory.

re:
> By the way, there is no /etc/syslog.conf in our SUSE Linux. What is the 
> substitute?

Hmm.  I seem to recall that SUSE comes with syslog-ng, not syslogd.  Given that
nobody that we know of has yet figured out how to setup syslog-ng to allow LDM
logging, I recommend that you install syslogd and disable syslog-ng.  I did
this on a SUSE machine at the Caribbean Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology
a couple of years back, so I know it is possible, but I don't remember exactly
how to do it right now.  I suggest doing a Google search using a search term
like 'syslogd suse'.  I recall a similar search led me to a website that had
step-by-step instructions for what to do (you will need 'root' privilege).

Cheers,

Tom
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Ticket Details
===================
Ticket ID: CIB-153307
Department: Support LDM
Priority: Normal
Status: Closed


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